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How to Make and Use Piping

How to Make and Use Piping

How to Make and Use Piping

by Carole Carter, From My Carolina Home

Would you like to add elegance and a finishing touch to your sewing and home dec projects? Adding piping is an easy way to pump up your sewing skills using the zipper foot from your Madam Sew Ultimate Presser Foot Set.

Begin by determining how large you want the piping to be, then purchase welting or cording in that size. Measure around the welting, in this case it is 1-1/4-inches. Now add one inch to that measurement.

Begin by determining how large you want the piping to be, then purchase welting or cording in that size. Measure around the welting, in this case it is 1-1/4-inches. Now add one inch to that measurement.

So, adding one inch to your welting circumference measurement, cut a strip of fabric that size, in this case, 2-1/4-inches wide. You may need to piece some strips together to go all the way around your project with some overlap for completing the piping. I am most comfortable with a four inch overlap (or a bit more) For my 12-inch pillow, I needed two strips of fabric making a total of about 56 inches (12x4+8=56). I chose a complementary print to the pillow front.

Now, attach the #20 Zipper foot to your machine. Adjust the bar to where the needle is just at the edge of the foot within the cutout.

Fold the fabric strip over the welting, right side out, and pin in place meeting the raw edges together.

Pin all the way, as this will make it easier to feed through your machine and limit the fabric from shifting around.

Sew as close to the welting as you can, beginning several inches away from the end. The zipper foot will keep the piping tight against the welting, and the stitching line will be right next to it. Stop before you get to the end, as you’ll need the extra room to join the ends when you get to that point.

Sew as close to the welting as you can, beginning several inches away from the end. The zipper foot will keep the piping tight against the welting, and the stitching line will be right next to it. Stop before you get to the end, as you’ll need the extra room to join the ends when you get to that point.

Rounding the corners makes it easier to go around them. If you have to, take the project out and reposition it as you get to the corners, backstitching a few stitches to keep the stitches from coming out.

When you get to the end, join the ends of the fabric in the usual fashion, then trim the welting to fit, taking off any raveling end.

Then trim the other side to fit.

Stitch the last part tightly against the welting as you did for the main body of the piping.

Turn the project over, see the stitching line on the back side? This will become your guide to putting the pieces together.

Make the backing for the pillow by cutting two pieces of fabric that are at least half the width of your project plus three inches. I actually make mine even a bit larger as it makes the backing easier to work with as the pieces are put together.

Turn under one center edge and stitch to finish it. I changed to the #6 Straight Edge foot from the Madam Sew Ultimate Presser Foot Set to do this.

 

 

Overlap the finished edges 2-1/2 inches.

In the top piece, add a buttonhole, and sew a button to the bottom piece. Button the pieces together, and pin the edges to hold them in place.

Place the pillow top and back right sides together, and pin.

 

 

Sew on the previous stitching line.

 

Make sure that your stitching is right on that previous stitching line, as that will ensure the piping is exactly right. Stop and reposition as needed.

 

Trim away any excess backing fabric.

Remove the pins and turn right side out. All done and ready to stuff.

Rounded corners are less trouble than pointed ones with piping. The lines you see on the piping here are actually part of the fabric pattern, not stitching.

You can make piping almost any size you can imagine, all you need is something to wrap the fabric around. Cording in really small widths work better for clothing like blouses, while the medium size shown on the right is good for outerwear.

 

Cut your fabric 2-1/4 to 2-1/2-inches wide, even if your piping is smaller. This makes it easier to sew and trim. Sew the piping in the same manner.

 

Trim the piping fabric to 5/8-inch from the seam line to the raw edge, as is standard for clothing seams. Then, sew the piping to the garment piece where you want the piping to be.

 

Place the pattern pieces right sides together, and sew along the piping sewing line, placing that piece on top.

 

Now, when the pieces are turned right side out, the piping will be between the pieces.

Now, look at your patterns for seams you can accent with contrasting piping. Many of the seams pointed out on these patterns would be perfect for that extra designer touch. Inserting piping at the edge of a lapel, into a yoke seam or along a princess line seam will give your clothes an added flair.

And your home dec pillows will look professionally finished.

Think about other places you could use piping too, perhaps on the edge or as an accent on curtains and potholders, and around the seams of a tea cozy or toaster cover, or between the seams on your next handbag. Your only limit is your imagination!

Happy sewing!!
Carole

I’d love to invite you to visit my blog, From My Carolina Home, for more fun projects, quilt alongs and mystery quilts! My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living.

4 comments

  • Like to join your blog

    Stella Cutri
  • Thanks for sharing this skill. It was easy to follow and the pictures were great. I would love to print it out and put it in my book.

    Rena Beyke
  • Very nicely presented and explained tutorial, Carole. Love your fabric. I underscore your comment to slightly round the corners, especially when using a thick cording. It’s easier to curve without bunching the cording. I also clip the corner fabric to ease turning, carefully so I don’t cut through the stitching.

    Joan
  • merry Christmas,and blessing all year long

    barbara premo

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4 comments

  • Like to join your blog

    Stella Cutri
  • Thanks for sharing this skill. It was easy to follow and the pictures were great. I would love to print it out and put it in my book.

    Rena Beyke
  • Very nicely presented and explained tutorial, Carole. Love your fabric. I underscore your comment to slightly round the corners, especially when using a thick cording. It’s easier to curve without bunching the cording. I also clip the corner fabric to ease turning, carefully so I don’t cut through the stitching.

    Joan
  • merry Christmas,and blessing all year long

    barbara premo